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[Issue] Young Song, learn to sing through oil field

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Photo by Scott Wieman / wikimedia

According to research published on June 12th in Natural Ecology and Evolution, birds are partly learned through genetic transmission of songs.

It is said that even if a bird of some species is raised by another species, it responds more strongly to the sound it emits.

To find these results, the researchers observed two species of birds in the Baltic Sea, the equidae and collared habitats of the same sex.

The hatchlings of eggs in both eggs responded to the sound of their husbands when they had not been hatching for 10 days.

The researchers decided to let the eggs before hatching hear the sound of paper scraps and see if the cubs would learn the sounds they originally sounded.

But the researchers found that the cubs opened their beaks and responded more strongly to the sound of their peers.

David Wittcroft, co-author of the study, said, "The difference in the songs the birds sing is that birds play an important role in choosing the right mating partner and complicated social interaction."

"The genetic element in making the difference in the sound of birds explains the fact that they can learn to follow the sound of their peers even if they are in an environment where the sounds coexist," he said.

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