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[Parenting] Cockroaches also have parentage and maternity.

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Photo Source: Assekuranz24 (Pixabay)

It turns out that the cockroach we think of as a pest has maternal instincts.

Some cockroach varieties, such as armor cockroaches that live mainly in North America, are known to have strong parentage and maternal love.

The armor cockroach mother nestles on rotten logs and lays eggs, and takes care of the cub roaches with her husband's cockroach for three years.

Parent insects take care of their "homes," clean the nests, protect young pups, and feed.

The young cockroach, in return, takes care of the body of the cockroach until it leaves the nest.

Termites, on the other hand, have similar sexes, such as cockroaches, but they are more complicated.

Larger termite species, termed Darwin's termites, are found only in Australia. Studies have shown that they use communities to raise time and resources to help young insects.

The termite kingdom consisted of kings and queens, soldiers guarding their nests, workers cleaning, repairing and nourishing their nests. Parent termites produce biological signal chemicals called pheromones that feed pups.

Because of this chemical termite termites stay in the nest. If the parent termites die over and the chemical is no longer available, the termites grow up to partner and start producing chemicals for their young.

Cockroaches are a bit different from termites. The grown-up cockroaches leave their nest of parent cockroaches to form their new flock by giving birth to their cubs.

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