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[Pet] Causes, symptoms and treatment of dog degenerative osteomyelitis

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▲ Source = Flickr

Degenerative osteomyelitis in dogs simply means that the 'insulation coating' of the spinal cord is worn out and broken. As a result, neurons that transmit neural information die.

In other words, the disease interferes with the communication of the brain and limbs. As a result, dogs have difficulty regulating urination due to loss of athletic ability of the hind legs. If the symptoms get worse, the forelegs can not move, and at worst, self-breathing is impossible.

Degenerative osteomyelitis begins when the dog becomes a dog and progresses slowly until the dog can not walk on its own.

Usually, large dogs have symptoms between 8 and 9 years old, and small dogs have symptoms around 11 years old. Typical symptoms include slight twisting of the limbs, weakening, decreased hindlimb motion, and the disease progresses slowly over several months.

Experts explain that degenerative osteomyelitis is a painless disease and progress is very slow. However, since other spinal disorders also have similar symptoms, they must be properly diagnosed by a neurologist. If it is not degenerative osteomyelitis, other diseases should be treated immediately.

Unfortunately, there is no way to cure this disease. However, getting regular rehabilitation helps improve puppies' condition.

Dogs can enjoy the rest of their daily lives, except that they can not move their legs and can not control urination, so they must be given the help of a person.

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