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[Parenting] Avoiding the tropical storm of birds inhabit the Louisiana coast

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Photo: Wikimedia

Some coasts in Louisiana, US, affected tropical storm Cindy, and the small birds and bird eggs that live near the coast were greatly damaged.

Audubon, a new sanctuary in Louisiana, Eric Johnson said storms broke out at the end of the bird's breeding season and that the terns and Wilson Morte were injured near the high tide near the Louisiana coast.

"When this storm is thrown, all the work we did during the summer is in vain," Johnson said. These birds live close to high tide, so once they have a storm, they are completely deserted. "

Johnson said that from April 30 to May 1, before the impact of the tropical storm Cindy, strong winds have made the water level much higher.

Terns and wiltons breed from mid - April to mid - July or late, and most of their nests were washed away by tropical storm Cindy, he said.

"But the birds will build their nests again to try again," Johnson said.

Birds take about 4 weeks to hatch after laying eggs, and it takes another four weeks to learn how to wake up. At this time, higher water levels are fatal to birds.

The storm occurred just before the egg hatch or hatch, and there is little chance that birds will flourish again this season, Johnson explained.

Coastal birds and nests are monitored through a coastal stewardship program with Oudubon Louisiana partners and the US Bird Sanctuary. And throughout the summer, scientists watch the birds in both Grand Island and Cameron Parish.

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